Thursday, October 30, 2014

PeopleSoft's paths to the Cloud - Part II

In my previous post, I've covered some ways in which cloud computing features could be used with PeopleSoft, particularly around Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and non-Production environments. Now, I'm going to discuss how cloud technologies bring value to PeopleSoft Production environments.

Gain Flexibility



Some of the advantages of hosting PeopleSoft Production environments using an IaaS provider were also mentioned in the my past article as they are also valid for Non Production environments:

  • Ability to adjust processing power (CPU) and memory according to peak usage.
  • Storage may be enlarged at any time to cope with increasing requirements.
  • Possibility of replicating the existing servers for contingency purposes.

In terms of cost, hosting the Production environment in IaaS may not always be cheaper than the on premise alternative (this needs to be analyzed on a case by case basis). However, the possibility to add more CPU, memory and storage on the run gives IaaS solutions an unprecedented flexibility. It is true that you can obtain similar flexibility with in house virtualized environments, but not many in-house data centers have the available horsepower of Amazon, IBM or Oracle data centers, to name a few.

Be Elastic



Adding additional power to the existing servers may not be the best way to scale up. An alternative way is to add a new server to the PeopleSoft architecture. This type of architecture is called elastic (actually, Amazon EC2 stands for Elastic Computing), as the architecture can elastically grow or shrink in order to adapt to the user load.

Many PeopleSoft customers use Production environments with multiple servers for high availability purposes. You may have two web servers, two application servers, two process schedulers, and so on. This architecture guarantees a better system availability in case one of the nodes fails. Using an elastic architecture means that we can add, for instance, a third application server not only to increase redundancy, but also the application performance.

In order to implement an elastic architecture, you need to fulfill two requirements:

  1. You should be able to quickly deploy an additional instance of any part of the architecture. 
  2. Once the instance is created, it should be plugged in the rest of the components, without disrupting the system availability.

The first point is easily covered by creating an Amazon AMI which can be instantiated at any moment. I've discussed the basics about AMIs in my previous post, but there is plenty of information from Amazon.

The second point is a bit trickier. Let's assume we are adding a new application server instance. If you do not declare this application server in the web servers configuration.properties file, it will not be used.

Of course you can do this manually, but my suggestion is that you try to automate these tasks, as it is this automation which will eventually bring elasticity to your architecture. You need to plan the automation not only for enlarging the architecture, but also for potential reduction (in case you covered a usage peak by increasing the instances and then you want to go back to the original situation).

At BNB we have built a generic elastic architecture, covering all layers of a normal PeopleSoft architecture. If you are planning to move to a cloud infrastructure and you need assistance, we would be happy to help.

Coming Next...

In my next post on this topic, I will cover how Database as a Service could be used to host PeopleSoft databases and what value it brings to PeopleSoft customers.

2 comments:

Santosh Tripathi said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Nick said...

So are you saying that you can run Peoplesoft (HR and Finance) using IAAS successfully in the cloud for production environments? Thanks